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and brash mayor, and the people of new york city loved him. we'll tell you about that, straight ahead. christine. >>> and the first jobs report of 2013 released in an hour and a half. the numbers for you, what it means for the health of the economy and the jobs market. >> and the defense secretary nominee on the defensive. chuck hagel grilled on capitol hill. did he blow his shot to convince lawmakers that he's the right man for the job? >> friday, february 1st, and "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome, everybody. breaking news, we start with. two people have died, several people wounded in explosion that has taken place outside the u.s. embassy in ankara, turkey. chris lawrence joins us from the pentagon. >> reporter: good morning, soledad. not much information right now. turkey authorities are responding to that scene, trying to collect more information. the blast happened just a short while ago, some. news reports out of that area, saw a big flash, heard a big bang. reports of several people wounded near a side gate of the embassy. we're waiting for more information, the
city mayor ed koch has died. he passed away from congestive heart failure. he had really problems with his health over the last many years. mayor koch elected in 1977. he was a judge on the people's court, and he had been hospitalized recent well fluid on his lungs. moved to intensive care yesterday. he was 88 years old. richard socaridies joins us. writer for "new yorker," former aide to president clinton. when i was a kid growing up in long island, mayor koch was almost a mythical figure. >> larger than life. when i grew up in manhattan, he was mayor, and as you said, he was very feisty, said what he thought. new yorkers loved him. he gave new york some tough love. he would say whatever he thought, famous for savering a city from bankruptcy. but also governing at very challenging times, beginning of the aids crisis. a locality of racial tension and diversity. issues of racial tension and diversity in new york. he served during very challenging times, took very controversial positions, no one questioned he loved the city and a fighter for new york always. >> his personality itsel
. these if into effect during the day wednesday and will last in some cases through friday. from the twin cities of minneapolis and st. paul through south dakota, nebraska missouri kansas, and affecting highways 90 70 80 and 35. pretty heavy snow on the way. the storm is moving on shore today in the pacific northwest. it's coastal rain and mountain snow potentially over a foot in the sierra-nevada range. rain for los angeles coming up later tonight. then the storms moves through the rockies tonight and by early tomorrow with storms firing from austin to dallas. there could be severe weather. snow and ice starting to develop in parts of oklahoma and working up through kansas city. here's the forecast for the snowfall. starting tomorrow and lasting through the day friday, that pink area is where we could have over a foot and a half of snow with a lot of wind. blowing and drifting an issue. up toward the twin cities, maybe up to three to six inches of snow. bottom line, it looks like a mess. on the east side of the storm, there should be heavy flooding rain for the gulf coast. >>> fo
into effect during the day wednesday and will last in some cases through friday. from the twin cities of minneapolis and st. paul through south dakota nebraska missouri, kansas and affecting highways 90 70 80 and 35 some heavy snow on the way. the storm is moving onshore in the pacific northwest, it's coastal rain and mountain snow potentially over a foot in the sierra nevada range. some hurricane force wind gusts in some of the high terrain as well. rain in los angeles later tonight and the storm moves through the rockyies late tonight and storms firing from austin to dallas there could be severe weather and snow and ice developing in parts of oklahoma and working up through kansas city. here is the forecast for the snowfall starting tomorrow and lasting through the day friday, that pink area is where we could have over a foot and a half of snow with a lot of wind so blowing and drifting an issue, bottom line it looks like a mess and on the east side of the storm there should be heavy flooding rain for the gulf coast. >>> for the 33rd day in a row the price o
diagonalling them. we had a prayer vigil at city hall in public. there was no incidents, there was a great turnout. people showed that, coming down and you know, voting with their feet, so to speak and letting us know that they feel safe and they wanted to show support for the officers that have been involved in this and their families and to lift up prayers on their behalf. >> chief, i just heard the mayor say that riverside is safe and secure. i am sure that -- i hope the people feel that way and indeed, i hope they are. but you had two armed police officers on a routine duty who are not safe and secure. and they are armed. so this is a very dangerous situation. we have a rogue cop threatening to kill more fri. riverside, this was a random act of violence that came into our city. and so we responded appropriately and the police chief has led by example and is taking care of has troops, as well as our city. >> well, i wish all of you -- >> greta -- >> go ahead, chief. >> i wanted to add that we do believe that there was no specific target in riverside. i believe that these two officers un
>> on monday we arrested a group. we found a print shop in the area in benghazi city. we found 45,000 christian books. >> reporter: the foreigners were reportedly printing pamphlets complaining christianity. the material was mostly directed towards children. but proselytizing in libya is a criminal offense, punishable by death, according to a law carried over from moammar gadhafi reign. >> we are a 100% muslim country. this issue is not negotiable. >> reporter: the four missionaries are in custody in benghazi. the group is made up of a swedish american, an egyptian, a south african, and a south korean. libyan officials allow sharif to speak to the media. he says he was brought here from the moment they arrested him. and that he has been treated respectfully and not abused. he went on to admit the group was in libya to spread christianity. an official presence said there were also espionage allegations against him because he refused to meet with anything anyone from his embassy. ramsey said he declined because he knew he would get little help from egypt. >> george: gary joins us now. he has been
, etc. if every city and mitropoulos got hit hard on home building and retail and began to look up there traded sectors and began to look at the advance manufacturing sectors and basically would say, what do they need to survive and prosper? and do we have a skills problem? do we have an infrastructure problem? do we have an innovation break down, essentially between research and development, a prototype, development? this will basically follow the health of the cluster and particularly with small and medium-sized firms, what are they doing to essentially help lee is relatively small firms? -- help these small firms.?? >> john, said a funny thing. you said no matter how much the government screws up, caltech will still be caltech and m.i.t. will still be m.i.t. outside the beltway, it is a different reality and you talked about public and private partnerships at the local level. can you talk about why they are so important and maybe share your story about how you see the power partnerships? >> i did not mind it versus the real world. i spend most of my time with the company's seen
-span.org. michael is our last call. salt lake city. democrat. caller: what is a drone? i think people have some sort of misconception about it. it is a remotely highly vehicle, controlled by humans. not much different than if you had an f-16 flying over circling around. more than likely there is somebody on the ground identifying the target. somehow they have to identify the target before they make a strike. so, the either have somebody on the ground or electronic intelligence to find that out. also, like killing bin laden -- they could have used a drug to do that. what is the difference? they still killed him. i think people have a misconception about how remotely piloted vehicle -- what it is, what the function is. and if you -- on the secrecy part -- if you release the information about who you are killing and how you got the information and where they are, the more you release that kind of information, the more our intelligence services suffer. because they are no longer a bird -- able to function in secret. because if you let everything out, it is no longer a secret. it is self defeating. so, a
joining gangs. now this report from mexico city. >> the new plan announced by the president is a departure from the previous government strategy. by saying they need to spend more money on social development programs, they are saying the military strategy of the former president did not work. calderon had a 50,000 soldiers and federal police waging war against drug gangs and organized crime groups. there are still many checkpoints and the military still involved. but the president is saying we're not calling to get out of this mess unless we really developed out youth. there are 7 million mexicans under age of 39 who are not employed and they are easy targets for gangs looking for cheap wolabor. -- under the age of 30. the says we need to develop these young people, give them opportunities, and see what they can do with their lives other and worked for criminals. we're not hearing many specifics on how the government will spend the money other than the fact they will try to spend in 250 of the most violent towns across the country. >> hugo chavez is having extremely complex and stuff cance
at this one place in the city can you actually claim asylum. the police take only 20 claims a week. this selection process has been described as arbitrary. the police say it has improved. we were ordered to leave before it took place. queuing andrants 200 lead and once per week, that is a one in 10 chance. it does not stop people from coming. we ask to speak to the minister and to the police spokesperson about the allegations of mistreatment. at about the deficiencies of the system. the greek government declined our request. the director -- they directed us to speak to this woman, the head of the new asylum service. --2011, the greek government it pledged to change. it is two years on from the judgment and still we find out, 300 asylum seekers in the freezing cold lying on the ground, 20 people only selected. that cannot be right. said, this is one of the problems. we are gearing up for that. we are recruiting many people. we expect to have up boards of 250 new staff members for the asylum service. this is a very big investment. >> for muhammed and things like him, she has this mes
soaring in the skies above this ancient city by the nile ended in disaster for one group. their balloon plunged into a field. egyptian government officials say 18 aboard died and three others were hurt. a witness told nhk he saw the pilot had a passenger jump out after the basket caught fire. he said the balloon rose hire and was soon engulfed in flames and then crashed in a sugarcane field. associated press reports there was an explosion saying it plunged 300 meters from the sky. state-run media say casualties included people from hong kong, belgium, britain and france. it says the egyptian pilot is hurt. the travel coordinated says the operator of the balloon had had two accidents in the past two years. >> accident in the morning about 6:30. this company i call rubbish company and i tell the people this way. >> why is that? >> he have two fires before. >> hot air ballooning is popular with those who visit luxor. >>> people in a number of different countries have been involved in fatal hot air balloon accidents in the past. in january 2012 a balloon flying northeast of the new zealand
an offensive to seize an eastern city. at least 13 people were killed and dozens wounded when a bus exploded near syria's border with turkey. speaking at a public event in new york, u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon continued to warn syria is being torn apart. >> fighting and citrine rages are on the rise. the catalog of world crimes is mounting, sexual violence is widespread the destruction of systematic. syria is being torn apart limb by limb. >> admits the unrelenting violence, both the al-assad regime and the opposition are opening the window to potential up associations. responding to a rival offer for talks and the opposition- controlled north, the assad regime said monday it's willing to meet anywhere abroad. in an interview, assange, a member said he would sit down with opposition leader al- khativ "in any foreign city to discuss the preparations for national dialogue." clashes erupted in egypt monday on the second anniversary the overthrow of longtime dictator hosni mubarak. police fired teargas and water cannons at groups of demonstrators after thousands marched to the gates of th
of the very practices under shaken by the city units that you once operated. for example, as treasury secretary he would be responsible for coordinating implementation of the so-called looker rules, which is intended to separate proprietary trading from the federally insured financial activities. you stated that you support the rule, and yet you were the chief operating officer for the units engaged in the sort of the activities the rule was meant to prevent. therefore if you were to be confirmed it could lead to an awkward situation in which your role as the chair of the fsoc from tester of the fsoc coming to effectively saying to the financial firms do as i say, not as i did. now these are not trivial matters. indeed, they bear directly on your qualifications to serve as the next treasury secretary. if the committee was given time to examine the record more thoroughly before today's hearing, i'm sure many of the questions that have already been answered. we have to explore some of these matters here today. finally, i just want to mention that when we met the nomination i told you th
, in some of the larger cities and then some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online. that is pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content it was 40% of that comes from the united states. >> host: so that is the appetite? >> guest: there is appetite clearly. online streamers. >>ing are fresh should have content to have people cross over. >> al-jazeera purchased current tv in december last year. just month 1/2 ago. how about expanding the american audience. who will you reach right now? >> potentially estimated 50 million viewers. if you talk going 4 1/2 million homes to 50 million homes, obviously a great leap forrd -- forward. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the meshes. this opens some eyeballs to us and we hope we'll give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it from those that haven't seen it and provide another platform for the core audience that we already have. >> here are some facts about al-jazeera english channel. it is a 24 hour global news netwo
it is appropriate and fitting your best city made by side as it happens have certain effects in your permit in certain effects throughout general austin's command. can you give us your sense now, you have a day-to-day basis when engaged in deliberate planning -- can you give us your sense of what the threat daughter and africom and how well-positioned africom is. >> the press and africom reliever bob rudd three major areas, one being al qaeda and the islamic mockery of, which is where the french operations and the united states is ongoing. also al-shabaab in somalia a book for her rom and also the ally ray has discussed earlier here. visit the major threats to stability militarily, but of course they have significant other wants and government as well as health issues. >> i think you've touched on something that again is a critical issue that cuts across government capacity to provide basic service, the ability of governments to function is not as, at least to respond to the true nature of the people. one of the issues we talked about is that we have had military training operations that ha
and producing in ge-sun city work -- ge- sensitive markets. we will look at monitoring, maintaining the. t of publicly held germ classes, because there is concern about that. -- the purity of publicly-held germ classes, because there is concern about that. as will mitigate the risk associated when folks want to do things a little bit differently, in the same general space. it is part of managing risk. the long-term risk we will face, with a changing climate -- i will conclude with this. there is no question that the climate is changing. we recently furnished to assessments from usda on the impact of changing climates on agriculture and forestry. the conclusions were pretty obvious. higher temperatures lead to more intense weather patterns. more intense weather patterns lead to greater stress for crops and livestock. and increase tree mortality. we at usda have a responsibility to figure out ways in which we can mitigate the risks of something we really cannot control. when it happens, we cannot control when a drought occurs. we cannot control when a horrible tornado hits, or when flooding
towards a freer environment of the city and move from the south to the north and that is what most people did. in the process of doing that, some of it became politicized. >> host: because they expected things to be markedly different in the north. they didn't think racism was in the north. >> guest: in the north they are not going to be murdered for taking a stand. and so in the relatively freer environment they are able to really create the conditions for the modern movement. >> host: talk about some of the people of the movement. those in sncc and those nclc and others. who were the people who'd -- was a king, was that nocco max? was that the death of medgar evers? >> guest: all of the above. all of them had different roles. one of the ways in which i try to explain this is rosa parks made martin luther king possible. martin luther king didn't make rosa parks possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give a per seat on the montgomery bus martin luther king would have simply been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. it's because of rosa parks that we are talking
living and working here are undocumented. jose zacarias, the only hispanic city council member believes a path to citizenship will empower more hispanics to help run the town in which they are the majority. >> maybe a generation more will be integrated, established in this community. >> reporter: two communities in one trying to grow together in a changing world. mark potter, nbc news, west liberty, iowa. >> meanwhile, in washington, we are six days away from budget cuts known as the sequester going into effect and with congress having taken the last week off it doesn't seem we're any closer to a deal being reached than we were at this time last week. just how are both sides playing their sequester strategies? joining me to discuss that in the war room is admiral joe sestak, former navy officer and pennsylvania congressman and republican strategist and former aide to george h.w. bush. thank you for being with me, gentlemen. >> good to be with you, mara. >> let's start with the president's strategy. this week he did a bunch of local interviews and the white house issued a bunch of press
to september 11th there were no fewer than four significant attacks against the western interests in the city. i'd like to have you put the chart up there, and leave it up during the course of this hearing, because each member of here has a copy of this, and there's certain things that happened we all know. we know that on may 22nd the red cross was hit with an rpg. they left town. we know that on june 11th, the british ambassador's motorcade was attacked by an rpg. they left town. we know on april 10th, the united nations convoy was hit by an ied, and on june 6th the u.s. consulate was attacked with a bomb. and many, many other things and we didn't leave. while i understand the state department has primary responsibility for the protection of american diplomats rolled the world, also understand that the defense department plays an important supporting role to this effect. i suspect or witnesses to explain today why, given the clear indicators and warnings, thats to the united states interests in ben georgia si, and throughout the north africa, were growing, was the defense department not pla
adn from new york city steve mcmahan. thank you to both of the. as we look at the state of the union, what do you think about the tone? what about the term of the president's delivery ended the way he was saying his message? guest: i think he did what many presidents do in the state of the union address, he laid out an agenda for the future. those things tend to be kind of a list. then he built to a crescendo at the end on having a vote on the gun-control measures that he has introduced. i thought it was a terrific state of the union address that did lay out the agenda. republicans know what it is he would like to accomplish. american people know what is at stake. now we will see if congress is willing to act. guest: you had the inaugural and the state of the union. he laid out a pretty aggressive liberal agenda. obviously there will be some differences of opinion that emerge out of this. whether it be the debt ceiling, the sequester, the continuing resolution of getting the budget, the sequence of things the speech set up in terms of the beginning of this course. having said that, i
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
america to the vast expanses of asia and the great cities of europe and all countries in between, cia officers were there, sometimes in force and sometimes virtually standing alone. and for those 25 years, it was a great honor for me to be a cia officer, as i knew that this country's contributions to security rise in valuable as they were innumerable. following my retirement from the cia in 2005, i had the good fortune to experience other opportunities. for three years, i served as ceo of a private-sector company, where i learned firsthand about fiduciary responsibilities and sound business practices. and for the past four years and i have had the privilege to serve as the president's principal policy advisor on homeland security and counterterrorism. i have had the opportunity to work with some of the finest americans i have ever met. in the intelligence, military, law enforcement, and diplomatic communities, who have dedicated their lives to the safety and security of fellow americans. it is because of the work of those americans serving domestically, and especially those serving in
of the largest cities and in some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online, and that is a pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content, a good percentage of that comes from the united states. there is an appetite, clearly. how much of that will translate to a cable channel again where some of these folks are dedicated online streamers' is a challenge, but we hope we can provide interesting and freshen up content and have some people cross over. host: how will the recent purchase expand the american audience? who will you be able to reach now? >> -- guest: it is an estimated 50 million viewers. obviously it is a great leap forward and a great deal. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the americas. this just opens some eyeballs to us, and we hope it will give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it for those who have not seen it, and again, provide a platform for the core audience we already have. host: it is a 24-hour global news network carried in places like new york
and whether there are variations with regards to the possibilities of insurgency depending upon city and region. last comment i would like to address what the united states should contemplate with regards to its own actions in the region. even before your the u.s. government -- even before the u.s. government decided that it was going to participate in a nato exercise to essentially dismantle the gaddafi regime in libya, i knew as that decision was going to be taken that there would be consequences throughout. the region -- muammar gaddafi provided a regime of stability that was provided by his provision of direct economic benefits to the region, not only in terms of investment, but also in terms of direct transfers of ies.y i it was predictable that upon his demised not only with those economic benefits be removed, but that tuareg soldiers would no longer be on the payroll. no longer being on the payroll, they would then have to return to their countries of origin because there were no longer employed. in the context of his demise, two very important arms depots were made available
% of the global population migrates to cities by 2050. further away from the food, where the food is grown, requiring new ways to prevent waste, and enhanced nutrition. here's another illustration, one should stick out all the statistics that are thrown at you so far. in fact, if there's one thing that i hope you will remember from my remarks this morning, it would be this. i still, it's just breathtaking just to say this. a full 30-50% of the food produced in the world rots forgoes unbeaten. -- or goes unbeaten. that to me is one of the most amazing statistics i will ever articulate. up to half of our total global output. except while waste might be the problem here in the developed world, the problem and the developing countries be getting the goods to market, as we all know. roughly 85% of the food produced never crosses international borders. and given the unequal distribution of people in arable land i just mentioned, that is a major obstacle today of feeding the world. so when it comes down to is that we need to produce more, higher quality, more nutritious food, and we need to becom
and fitting your best city made by side as it happens have certain effects in your permit in certain effects throughout general austin's command. can you give us your sense now, you have a day-to-day basis when engaged in deliberate planning -- can you give us your sense of what the threat daughter and africom and how well-positioned afrcom is. >> the press and africom reliever bob rudd three major areas, one being al qaeda and the islamic mockery of, which is where the french operations and the united states is ongoing. also al-shabaab in somalia a book for her rom and also the ally ray has discussed earlier here. visit the major threats to stability militarily, but of course they have significant other wants and government as well as health issues. >> i think you've touched on something that again is a critical issue that cuts across government capacity to provide basic service, the ability of governments to function is not as, at least to respond to the true nature of the people. one of the issues we talked about is that we have had military training operations that have gone in over the
to the other side of the city. [laughter] second, i started to pay special attention to the plaques on the buildings that recommend -- that recognize the united states of america for lending a hand in rebuilding. i was proud. the marshall plan, imf, and other organizations led by the united states are evidence of our ability to make the right decisions at the right time, taking risks today in the interest of tomorrow. we now face a similar crossroads. we can be complacent or competitive as markets bloom in every corner of the world. with or without us. we could be there to help plant the seeds or we can see the power to others. given the chance to lead a second great american century, we must not just look to the american landscape today. look at the days to come. we must marshal the courage that define the the marshall plan so that we might secure in the future freedom. let's remember the principles of jefferson's time. looking to independence echoing in our time. interest istional in leading strongly and it still in doers in this world. let me leave you with a thought. when traged
interests in the city. i'd like to have you go ahead and put that chart up. and leave it up during the course of this hearing because each member up heres a a copy of this. there are certain things that happened we all know. we know on may 22 the red cross was hit with an r.p.g. they left town. we know on june 11, the british ambassador's motorcade was attacked by an r.p.g. they left town. we know on april 10 the united states convoy was hit by an i.e.d. and on june 6, the u.s. consulate was attacked with a bomb and many, many other things. but we stayed. we didn't leave. while i understand the state department has primary responsibility for the protection of american diplomats around the world, i also understand that the defense department plays an important role -- supporting role to this effect. i expect our witnesses to explain today why, given the clear indication -- indicators tanned warnings, threats to the united states interests in benghazi and throughout the north africa were growing was the -- was the defense department not placed on a heightened alert status or adequate
can change that cities good ideas can be heard? >> congressman, it comes down to at the ministry of and congressional demand that the mission itself would be effectively carried out. then there has to be a focus and oversight the best way to do that and whether the department of homeland security is implementing it so the extent that if they go back to the suspects in the defense committee the question is are there better ideas that can infect the incorporated command can refine the methodology to do that other than the general contractor type of approach? as we know, the typical approach of the government particularly the dhs is too high year a big player and the innovative small business people that you're talking about simply become players as subcontractors to read the question is can we find a way to make sure that we are fully engaged in the most innovative small business people as they come up with new and innovative ideas and that is an administrative approach within the congress can rightly demand. >> we now recognize you for a question. >> spending tax dollars wisely li
's from huffington post. to bonnie, let's go to our republican line next, to nicholas in new york city. nicholas, welcome. >> caller: well, it's great to be here, and thank you, and i'll try to make it brief, and let me apologize to the others waiting on line. i just, very quickly, you know, i came here as a child in 1966, and they moved us up to the bronx. we came here through red cross auspices. and, you know, my dad and mom worked two and three jobs, eventually they bought real estate because they saved their money. we were subsistence farmers back home -- >> host: nicholas, where -- where was back home? you said you came here in '66. where was back home? >> caller: montenegro today on border of albanian on the coast of adriatic sea. we were albanian catholics. in fact, we were a minority amongst other minorities, but we were the minority. >> host: back to our question, how do you think these budget cuts will affect you? >> guest: well, i've been watching this thing, and it seems like i've seen this movie before. now, i've worked very hard as my mom and daddied, as my brothers do, a
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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